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Gray Designs' latest auto-influenced yacht dubbed Xhibitionist [w/video]

Posted Feb 20th 2013 10:00AM

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Gray Designs' Xhibitionist yacht - profile rendering

Swedish designer Eduard Gray, who you've heard of via the Dartz Jo-Mojo and Pombron Nagel concepts and delightful Saab 92010 Sixten concept, is back at the drawing board penning boats and matching supercars. Following the Strand Craft 122, the Xhibitionist is a 75-metre superyacht with unmissable automotive cues, and it is said to be the inspiration for the Xhibit-G supercar.

The Xhibitionist is a multi-purpose watercraft whose inner spaces can be rearranged into a car showroom, a partitioned retail space or a luxury lounge for guests. The 'hood' at the bow opens up to release an array of solar panels that are sturdy enough to act as a platform for entertaining or as a helipad. Beneath that is a viewing deck, while out back, guests can enjoy the hot tub on the fly deck.

Motivation for the Xhibitionist comes from hybrid engines in the "powerplant gallery," but the carbon-fibre-bodied Xhibit-G supercar with its aluminum chassis gets more traditional gumption from a 630-horsepower V12. Oddly for a supercar, though, the car is limited to a top speed of (250 km/h) 155 mph. Inside is white leather set off by black carbon fibre and chrome. The supercar is said to be for Zeus Twelve, a supercar brand working with Mansory and Lotus.

You can check out the video below to see how the Xhibitionist gets attention, and read more about it in the press release.





You can be forgiven for thinking, at first glance, that you're seeing a leaked still from a yet-to-be released, Fifth Element style sci-fi blockbuster. Far from being fiction, though, this yacht has been designed with very real, very modern and very useful applications in mind. It is, first and foremost, a cleverly engineered workhorse; a nautical tool designed to fulfill many different roles. As the name and unconventional appearance may suggest, this is no ordinary yacht. This is something completely different. This is the Xhibitionist.

Brainchild of renown Swedish-based designer, Eduard Gray, the Xhibitionist is partly inspired by traditions as old as seafaring itself. The desire to rekindle some of those traditions in an ultra-modern setting has resulted in, not only, the creation of a jaw-dropping superyacht, but the creation of a veritable entity that has almost developed a personality of its own. As much thought has gone into the conception of this vessel in terms of its viability as has gone into the actual structural design itself. It is, quite simply, a masterful blend of style, purpose and efficiency. One of the most striking elements on this one-of-a-kind vessel is the hull. The inverted trimaran configuration has been employed for one overriding reason; stability. That, in itself, speaks volumes about the real reason the Xhibitionist has come about.

Futureproof
Stability in any line of business can quite often mean going with the flow: literally. The Xhibitionist is endowed with the capability to evolve with and adapt to the pace of change we see in todays world alongside maintaining its enduring aesthetic appeal. It has been futureproofed in some respects; both in terms of its actual features and its potential 'lives', as it were.

Unlike a 'private' yacht, this versatile yacht has been designed to do a job; or rather, jobs. What those jobs are could vary tremendously but one of them is probably abundantly obvious: this thing has been designed to wantonly, shamelessly, unabashedly and knowingly steal the show.

'Show' is, really, at the crux of what the Xhibitionist is all about. Aside from being a 'show' unto itself, it has been created in such a way that some of the real showing takes place on the inside. The shape of the outside may give some people a clue as to where we're heading next. The undeniably automotive lines are testament to Eduard Grays achievements as a designer of supercars (one of which, the Xhibit-G, has been specially created to complement the Xhibitionist). A common first reaction, it has to be said, is just that; ..'it looks like a car' (indeed, Batman has been mentioned a few times, too).

Art-Nouveau Styling
As far as investments go, the Xhibitionist resembles more of a real estate and marketing venture than a yacht. If so desired, it can effectively be used as an exclusive, floating showroom. A Steinway piano completes the scene beautifully while the vessel is in 'guest mode'. The dual staircase by Cornish Stairways adds a homely familiarity to the main exhibition room in its full open glory and the Baccarat lighting perfectly complements the subtle Art-Nouveau styling throughout. In 'Retail Mode' the partitions are in place creating many individual spaces for a more private retail experience and the Nuance smart shading feature from Vision Systems provides yet more privacy at the swipe of a fingertip.

Sunshine is something the Xhibitionist is particularly fond of. Further aft we have the powerplant gallery. 'Engine room' doesn't quite cut it in this case and, being a somewhat unique feature, the engines are plainly visible; housed behind glass walls allowing for easy access for maintenance and, of course, hours of unfettered entertainment for engineering enthusiasts. They will be the ones most impressed by the choice of hybrid drive systems that control this 75 meter (14m beam) nautical wonder. Their position in the floor accounts for the Xhibitionists relatively shallow, marina-friendly draft which, at a snip under two metres is extremely efficient for a yacht of this size.

Sun Lover
At the stern is the sprawling beach club area providing space for events closer to the lapping water. It is, as with most yachts, also an access point and will likely be the first place one would set foot on board. Matching pontoon extensions are also an option, should they be required.

Above all the fly deck is where the serious relaxation takes place. Two separate areas, one with a jacuzzi, provide guests with ample space to unwind in comfort and take in the views and sunshine.

Sunshine is something the Xhibitionist is particularly fond of. The animation in the video below shows the massive solar panels in operation; a sight to behold in itself. Opening up out of what looks like the hood of a giant sports car, they serve two purposes. The solar panels themselves not only provide power to the vessel; they're sturdy enough to act as a helipad, concert stage, or whatever else suits the need of the owner. The frontal section that drops down serves the same purpose as its counterpart on aircraft carriers; allowing for access and loading. It is not beyond the realms of imagination: seeing a celebrity DJ or a live band perched on the platform performing in front of ten thousand people in a marina.

At the bow of the yacht is another fascinating addition; the viewing window, Jacques Cousteau himself would have approved. Although it's above water, in this case, it provides a select group of guests with something of a secluded alcove; one with a spectacular view.

Floating, Working Asset
The Xhibitionist is an intelligently designed and finely tuned instrument that was made, quite simply, to turn heads. It marks its territory and keeps it long after the Sun has set.More than that, it poses a serious option for investors when comparing to the real estate market in terms of Dollars per square foot and as a key feature in a business model literally represents a floating, working asset. The size alone of the solar panels gives some indication of just how efficient the Xhibitionist can be (and how quietly it can glide into a marina). They also go to provide free energy for the final piece de resistance when talking eye candy..the nighttime illumination. As though the Xhibitionist weren't spectacular enough, and as you can see from the images below, evening lighting by OceanLED have ensured that it marks its territory and keeps it long after the sun has set.

Text by Chris Rider

Tropical Island Paradise Yacht

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